Reviews removed from the US market 3/21/00)


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Rezulin Drug Description
Rezulin
(troglitazone)

WARNINGS
Hepatic
Rare cases of severe idiosyncratic hepatocellular injury have been reported during marketed use (see ADVERSE REACTIONS). The hepatic injury is usually reversible, but very rare cases of hepatic failure, leading to death or liver transplant, have been reported. Injury has occurred after both short- and long- term troglitazone treatment.
During all clinical studies in North America, a total of 48 of 2510 (1.9%) Rezulin-treated patients and 3 of 475 (0.6%) placebo-treated patients had ALT levels greater than 3 times the upper limit of normal. Twenty of the Rezulin-treated and one of the placebo-treated patients were withdrawn from treatment. Two of the 20 Rezulin-treated patients developed reversible jaundice; one of these patients had a liver biopsy which was consistent with an idiosyncratic drug reaction. An additional Rezulin-treated patient had a liver biospy which was also consistent with an idiosyncratic drug reaction. (See ADVERSE REACTIONS, Laboratory Abnormalities)
It is recommended that serum transaminase levels be checked at the start of therapy, monthly for the first six months of therapy, every two months for the remainder of the first year of troglitazone therapy, and periodically thereafter. Liver function tests also should be obtained for patients at the first symptoms suggestive of hepatic dysfunction, e.g., nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue. anorexia, dark urine. Rezulin therapy should not be initiated if the patient exhibits clinical or laboratory evidence of active liver disease (e.g., ALT> 3 times the upper limit of normal) and should be discontinued if the patient has jaundice or laboratory measurements suggest liver injury (e.g., ALT> 3 times the upper limit of normal).

DRUG DESCRIPTION



What are the possible side effects of troglitazone (Rezulin)?

Stop taking troglitazone and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).
In rare cases, troglitazone has caused severe liver damage resulting in death or liver transplant. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, unusual fatigue, loss of appetite, yellow skin or eyes, itching, clay-colored stools, or dark urine. These symptoms may be early signs...
Read All Potential Side Effects for Rezulin »




Rezulin (troglitazone) is an oral antihyperglycemic agent which acts primarily by decreasing insulin resistance. Rezulin is used in the management of type II diabetes (noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) also known as adult-onset diabetes). It improves sensitivity to insulin in muscle and adipose tissue and inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis. Troglitazone (+-5[[4-[(3,4-dihydro-6- hydroxy-2,5.7,8-tetramethyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-yl) methoxy]phenyl]methyl]-2,4- thiazolidinedione) is not chemically or functionally related to either the sulfonylureas, the biguanides, or the (g-glucosidase inhibitors. The molecule contains 2 chiral centers, with each of the 4 stereoisomers having similar pharmacologic effects.
Troglitazone is a white to yellowish crystalline compound: it may have a faint. characteristic odor Troglitazone has a molecular formula of C24H2NO5S and a molecular weight of 441.55 daltons. It is soluble in N, N-dimethylformamide or acetone; sparingly soluble in ethyl acetate; slightly soluble in acetonitrile, anhydrous ethanol, or ether; and practically insoluble in water.
Rezulin is available as 200, 300 and 400 mg tablets for oral administration formulated with the following excipients: croscarmellose sodium, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol 400, polysorbate 80, povidone, purified water, silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, and synthetic iron oxides. Last reviewed on RxList: 12/8/2004




Rezulin Drug Description
Rezulin
(troglitazone)

WARNINGS
Hepatic
Rare cases of severe idiosyncratic hepatocellular injury have been reported during marketed use (see ADVERSE REACTIONS). The hepatic injury is usually reversible, but very rare cases of hepatic failure, leading to death or liver transplant, have been reported. Injury has occurred after both short- and long- term troglitazone treatment.
During all clinical studies in North America, a total of 48 of 2510 (1.9%) Rezulin-treated patients and 3 of 475 (0.6%) placebo-treated patients had ALT levels greater than 3 times the upper limit of normal. Twenty of the Rezulin-treated and one of the placebo-treated patients were withdrawn from treatment. Two of the 20 Rezulin-treated patients developed reversible jaundice; one of these patients had a liver biopsy which was consistent with an idiosyncratic drug reaction. An additional Rezulin-treated patient had a liver biospy which was also consistent with an idiosyncratic drug reaction. (See ADVERSE REACTIONS, Laboratory Abnormalities)
It is recommended that serum transaminase levels be checked at the start of therapy, monthly for the first six months of therapy, every two months for the remainder of the first year of troglitazone therapy, and periodically thereafter. Liver function tests also should be obtained for patients at the first symptoms suggestive of hepatic dysfunction, e.g., nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue. anorexia, dark urine. Rezulin therapy should not be initiated if the patient exhibits clinical or laboratory evidence of active liver disease (e.g., ALT> 3 times the upper limit of normal) and should be discontinued if the patient has jaundice or laboratory measurements suggest liver injury (e.g., ALT> 3 times the upper limit of normal).

DRUG DESCRIPTION



What are the possible side effects of troglitazone (Rezulin)?

Stop taking troglitazone and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).
In rare cases, troglitazone has caused severe liver damage resulting in death or liver transplant. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, unusual fatigue, loss of appetite, yellow skin or eyes, itching, clay-colored stools, or dark urine. These symptoms may be early signs...
Read All Potential Side Effects for Rezulin »




Rezulin (troglitazone) is an oral antihyperglycemic agent which acts primarily by decreasing insulin resistance. Rezulin is used in the management of type II diabetes (noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) also known as adult-onset diabetes). It improves sensitivity to insulin in muscle and adipose tissue and inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis. Troglitazone (+-5[[4-[(3,4-dihydro-6- hydroxy-2,5.7,8-tetramethyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-yl) methoxy]phenyl]methyl]-2,4- thiazolidinedione) is not chemically or functionally related to either the sulfonylureas, the biguanides, or the (g-glucosidase inhibitors. The molecule contains 2 chiral centers, with each of the 4 stereoisomers having similar pharmacologic effects.
Troglitazone is a white to yellowish crystalline compound: it may have a faint. characteristic odor Troglitazone has a molecular formula of C24H2NO5S and a molecular weight of 441.55 daltons. It is soluble in N, N-dimethylformamide or acetone; sparingly soluble in ethyl acetate; slightly soluble in acetonitrile, anhydrous ethanol, or ether; and practically insoluble in water.
Rezulin is available as 200, 300 and 400 mg tablets for oral administration formulated with the following excipients: croscarmellose sodium, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol 400, polysorbate 80, povidone, purified water, silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, and synthetic iron oxides. Last reviewed on RxList: 12/8/2004




Rezulin Drug Description
Rezulin
(troglitazone)

WARNINGS
Hepatic
Rare cases of severe idiosyncratic hepatocellular injury have been reported during marketed use (see ADVERSE REACTIONS). The hepatic injury is usually reversible, but very rare cases of hepatic failure, leading to death or liver transplant, have been reported. Injury has occurred after both short- and long- term troglitazone treatment.
During all clinical studies in North America, a total of 48 of 2510 (1.9%) Rezulin-treated patients and 3 of 475 (0.6%) placebo-treated patients had ALT levels greater than 3 times the upper limit of normal. Twenty of the Rezulin-treated and one of the placebo-treated patients were withdrawn from treatment. Two of the 20 Rezulin-treated patients developed reversible jaundice; one of these patients had a liver biopsy which was consistent with an idiosyncratic drug reaction. An additional Rezulin-treated patient had a liver biospy which was also consistent with an idiosyncratic drug reaction. (See ADVERSE REACTIONS, Laboratory Abnormalities)
It is recommended that serum transaminase levels be checked at the start of therapy, monthly for the first six months of therapy, every two months for the remainder of the first year of troglitazone therapy, and periodically thereafter. Liver function tests also should be obtained for patients at the first symptoms suggestive of hepatic dysfunction, e.g., nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue. anorexia, dark urine. Rezulin therapy should not be initiated if the patient exhibits clinical or laboratory evidence of active liver disease (e.g., ALT> 3 times the upper limit of normal) and should be discontinued if the patient has jaundice or laboratory measurements suggest liver injury (e.g., ALT> 3 times the upper limit of normal).

DRUG DESCRIPTION



What are the possible side effects of troglitazone (Rezulin)?

Stop taking troglitazone and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).
In rare cases, troglitazone has caused severe liver damage resulting in death or liver transplant. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, unusual fatigue, loss of appetite, yellow skin or eyes, itching, clay-colored stools, or dark urine. These symptoms may be early signs...
Read All Potential Side Effects for Rezulin »




Rezulin (troglitazone) is an oral antihyperglycemic agent which acts primarily by decreasing insulin resistance. Rezulin is used in the management of type II diabetes (noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) also known as adult-onset diabetes). It improves sensitivity to insulin in muscle and adipose tissue and inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis. Troglitazone (+-5[[4-[(3,4-dihydro-6- hydroxy-2,5.7,8-tetramethyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-yl) methoxy]phenyl]methyl]-2,4- thiazolidinedione) is not chemically or functionally related to either the sulfonylureas, the biguanides, or the (g-glucosidase inhibitors. The molecule contains 2 chiral centers, with each of the 4 stereoisomers having similar pharmacologic effects.
Troglitazone is a white to yellowish crystalline compound: it may have a faint. characteristic odor Troglitazone has a molecular formula of C24H2NO5S and a molecular weight of 441.55 daltons. It is soluble in N, N-dimethylformamide or acetone; sparingly soluble in ethyl acetate; slightly soluble in acetonitrile, anhydrous ethanol, or ether; and practically insoluble in water.
Rezulin is available as 200, 300 and 400 mg tablets for oral administration formulated with the following excipients: croscarmellose sodium, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol 400, polysorbate 80, povidone, purified water, silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, and synthetic iron oxides. Last reviewed on RxList: 12/8/2004




Rezulin Drug Description
Rezulin
(troglitazone)

WARNINGS
Hepatic
Rare cases of severe idiosyncratic hepatocellular injury have been reported during marketed use (see ADVERSE REACTIONS). The hepatic injury is usually reversible, but very rare cases of hepatic failure, leading to death or liver transplant, have been reported. Injury has occurred after both short- and long- term troglitazone treatment.
During all clinical studies in North America, a total of 48 of 2510 (1.9%) Rezulin-treated patients and 3 of 475 (0.6%) placebo-treated patients had ALT levels greater than 3 times the upper limit of normal. Twenty of the Rezulin-treated and one of the placebo-treated patients were withdrawn from treatment. Two of the 20 Rezulin-treated patients developed reversible jaundice; one of these patients had a liver biopsy which was consistent with an idiosyncratic drug reaction. An additional Rezulin-treated patient had a liver biospy which was also consistent with an idiosyncratic drug reaction. (See ADVERSE REACTIONS, Laboratory Abnormalities)
It is recommended that serum transaminase levels be checked at the start of therapy, monthly for the first six months of therapy, every two months for the remainder of the first year of troglitazone therapy, and periodically thereafter. Liver function tests also should be obtained for patients at the first symptoms suggestive of hepatic dysfunction, e.g., nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue. anorexia, dark urine. Rezulin therapy should not be initiated if the patient exhibits clinical or laboratory evidence of active liver disease (e.g., ALT> 3 times the upper limit of normal) and should be discontinued if the patient has jaundice or laboratory measurements suggest liver injury (e.g., ALT> 3 times the upper limit of normal).

DRUG DESCRIPTION



What are the possible side effects of troglitazone (Rezulin)?

Stop taking troglitazone and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).
In rare cases, troglitazone has caused severe liver damage resulting in death or liver transplant. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, unusual fatigue, loss of appetite, yellow skin or eyes, itching, clay-colored stools, or dark urine. These symptoms may be early signs...
Read All Potential Side Effects for Rezulin »




Rezulin (troglitazone) is an oral antihyperglycemic agent which acts primarily by decreasing insulin resistance. Rezulin is used in the management of type II diabetes (noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) also known as adult-onset diabetes). It improves sensitivity to insulin in muscle and adipose tissue and inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis. Troglitazone (+-5[[4-[(3,4-dihydro-6- hydroxy-2,5.7,8-tetramethyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-yl) methoxy]phenyl]methyl]-2,4- thiazolidinedione) is not chemically or functionally related to either the sulfonylureas, the biguanides, or the (g-glucosidase inhibitors. The molecule contains 2 chiral centers, with each of the 4 stereoisomers having similar pharmacologic effects.
Troglitazone is a white to yellowish crystalline compound: it may have a faint. characteristic odor Troglitazone has a molecular formula of C24H2NO5S and a molecular weight of 441.55 daltons. It is soluble in N, N-dimethylformamide or acetone; sparingly soluble in ethyl acetate; slightly soluble in acetonitrile, anhydrous ethanol, or ether; and practically insoluble in water.
Rezulin is available as 200, 300 and 400 mg tablets for oral administration formulated with the following excipients: croscarmellose sodium, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol 400, polysorbate 80, povidone, purified water, silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, and synthetic iron oxides. Last reviewed on RxList: 12/8/2004




Rezulin Drug Description
Rezulin
(troglitazone)

WARNINGS
Hepatic
Rare cases of severe idiosyncratic hepatocellular injury have been reported during marketed use (see ADVERSE REACTIONS). The hepatic injury is usually reversible, but very rare cases of hepatic failure, leading to death or liver transplant, have been reported. Injury has occurred after both short- and long- term troglitazone treatment.
During all clinical studies in North America, a total of 48 of 2510 (1.9%) Rezulin-treated patients and 3 of 475 (0.6%) placebo-treated patients had ALT levels greater than 3 times the upper limit of normal. Twenty of the Rezulin-treated and one of the placebo-treated patients were withdrawn from treatment. Two of the 20 Rezulin-treated patients developed reversible jaundice; one of these patients had a liver biopsy which was consistent with an idiosyncratic drug reaction. An additional Rezulin-treated patient had a liver biospy which was also consistent with an idiosyncratic drug reaction. (See ADVERSE REACTIONS, Laboratory Abnormalities)
It is recommended that serum transaminase levels be checked at the start of therapy, monthly for the first six months of therapy, every two months for the remainder of the first year of troglitazone therapy, and periodically thereafter. Liver function tests also should be obtained for patients at the first symptoms suggestive of hepatic dysfunction, e.g., nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue. anorexia, dark urine. Rezulin therapy should not be initiated if the patient exhibits clinical or laboratory evidence of active liver disease (e.g., ALT> 3 times the upper limit of normal) and should be discontinued if the patient has jaundice or laboratory measurements suggest liver injury (e.g., ALT> 3 times the upper limit of normal).

DRUG DESCRIPTION



What are the possible side effects of troglitazone (Rezulin)?

Stop taking troglitazone and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives).
In rare cases, troglitazone has caused severe liver damage resulting in death or liver transplant. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, unusual fatigue, loss of appetite, yellow skin or eyes, itching, clay-colored stools, or dark urine. These symptoms may be early signs...
Read All Potential Side Effects for Rezulin »




Rezulin (troglitazone) is an oral antihyperglycemic agent which acts primarily by decreasing insulin resistance. Rezulin is used in the management of type II diabetes (noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) also known as adult-onset diabetes). It improves sensitivity to insulin in muscle and adipose tissue and inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis. Troglitazone (+-5[[4-[(3,4-dihydro-6- hydroxy-2,5.7,8-tetramethyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-yl) methoxy]phenyl]methyl]-2,4- thiazolidinedione) is not chemically or functionally related to either the sulfonylureas, the biguanides, or the (g-glucosidase inhibitors. The molecule contains 2 chiral centers, with each of the 4 stereoisomers having similar pharmacologic effects.
Troglitazone is a white to yellowish crystalline compound: it may have a faint. characteristic odor Troglitazone has a molecular formula of C24H2NO5S and a molecular weight of 441.55 daltons. It is soluble in N, N-dimethylformamide or acetone; sparingly soluble in ethyl acetate; slightly soluble in acetonitrile, anhydrous ethanol, or ether; and practically insoluble in water.
Rezulin is available as 200, 300 and 400 mg tablets for oral administration formulated with the following excipients: croscarmellose sodium, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol 400, polysorbate 80, povidone, purified water, silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, and synthetic iron oxides. Last reviewed on RxList: 12/8/2004





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Learn about the prescription medication Rezulin (Troglitazone (removed from the US market 3/21/00)), drug uses, dosage, side effects, drug interactions, warnings, reviews and ... Rezulin (Troglitazone (removed from the US market 3/21/00)) Drug ...


Learn about Rezulin (Troglitazone (removed from the US market 3/21/00)) - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Pictures, Patient Information on RxList Rezulin (Troglitazone (removed from the US market 3/21/00 ...


WARNINGS Hepatic Rare cases of severe idiosyncratic hepatocellular injury have been reported during marketed use (see ADVERSE REACTIONS). The hepatic injury is usually ... Troglitazone (removed from the US market 3/21/00)


216.24 Drug products withdrawn or removed from the market for. reasons of safety or effectiveness. Authority: 21 U.S.C. 351, 352, 353a, 355, and 371. www.fda.gov


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Generic & Brand Name : Source: Brand Name : Rezulin Generic Name : Troglitazone (removed from the US market 3/21/00) rezulin


Rezulin (Troglitazone (removed from the US market 3/21/00)) Drug Information: Uses, Side Effects, Drug Interactions and Warnings at RxList: Description: Troglitazone - Information from the RxList.


Troglitazone (removed from the US market 3/21/00) WARNINGS From our sponsors: . From our sponsors: Hepatic Rare cases of severe idiosyncratic hepatocellular injury have been ... Drugs by Generic Name > T > Troglitazone


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